Tag Archives: Richie Porte

Marv’s 2017 Annual Report

Dear Rouleurs,

Hasn’t 2017 disappeared in the blink of an eye.  MMT had a great year all things considered.  He watched his adorable little red-haired girl grow from rug rat to toddler and attend childcare.  He received the best ever Father’s Day present in the form of her first steps in this world…awesome work bubba girl.  His beloved AFL football team, Richmond Tigers broke its 37 year drought and won the 2017 AFL Premiership.  MMT still gets goosebumps and feels a bit teary when thinks about that one.

So onto cycling, like Alan Kohler on ABC I have a bunch of pretty charts to present.  The first one shows my yearly worm, or how I accumulated kilometres over the course of the last 12 months. The sharp kick at the end is the Festive 500.  In December, alone, MMT did nearly 1000km.

The second, has the same data set, except its month by month.  This graph clearly shows the impact of worst cold and flu season Victoria has for 15 years. MMT was seriously YAFFed in April, June, August and September.  It also shows how doing Rapha related stuff has pushed my annual kilometres to almost 8,000.

The final graph shows my ride activity month on month.  It seems the combination of work, life, Bubba mean that about 22 to 25 rides a month is what I can expect for the next few years.

So in summary the numbers look like this:

So in an average month MMT, does 24 rides, for 660km, which takes about 28 hours and burns 33,460 calories.  Honestly, MTT feels that he should be much, much thinner than he is, after seeing these numbers.  That would be something to work on in 2018.

Until next blog, ride safe

Marv

PS Go Richie Porte in Team BMC in the 2018 TDU

Merry Christmas from MMT

Dear Rouleurs,

November and December have vanished in the blink of an eye, and MMT has not posted anything for over three weeks. MMT is way behind on updating his bike log.  A quick look at MMT’s Strava account reveals a grand total of almost 7,500 Km.  MMT has averaged 5 rides  and 160 Km a week all year.  Damn….thats not bad.  When MMT returns to work next year he’ll have to do the math and see where he ended up.

Santa came early for MMT.  He took delivery of a very cool and fast pair of Aeolus 5 wheels for his beloved Domane.  Whilst his wallet will hurt for a few months, the wheels have been absolutely superb and worth the $4,000 they cost.

The other nifty addition, to MMT’s never ending collection of bike paraphernalia, has been a Topeak bike seat.  This has been installed on Marv’s old Canondale F4, for the specific purpose of doing Sunday morning rides to the park with gorgeous half-pint daughter.  Here she is locked into the seat and enjoying being the centre of attention.

Change of topic, MMT scanned an article on Richie Porte a few months ago.  He’s Tasmania’s (er…Australia’s as well) best chance to win the Tour de France next year.  He had a horrific stack this year breaking his pelvis among other things.  You can see the screen capture of this incident, that I posted a few months ago.  The good news is that he is back training.  Another interesting development was the departure of Simon Gerrans to Porte’s Team BMC Racing.  That could make for a very interesting combination on the road next year.  Anyhow here’s blatant breach of copyright from Herald Sun a few months ago.

So finally, MMT and famil would like to wish any that may have accidently stumbled across this blog, a very Merry Christmas and a prosperous 2018.

Until next time, ride safe.

Marv

 

 

 

This is why I bought a bike with disc brakes…Ode to Richie Porte

OMG Rouleurs,

Stage 9 of the Tour De France was nail biting spectacle. Talk about thrills and spills.  With three long, brutally steep ascents where the riders were reduced to walking pace and corresponding descents made slippery by early rain, with more than 4,700 metres vertical elevation, and half the hors catégorie climbs in the entire race, this stage pushed all the riders to their limits.

Chris Froome lost his primary domestique, Welshman Geraint Thomas, and close friend and principal rival, Richie Porte, after both riders were forced to quit the race following slippery descents which turned the ninth stage into a chaotic demolition derby from Nantua to Chambéry. Froome retained the yellow jersey after the stage was won by the Colombian Rigoberto Urán.

The day’s official medical bulletin listed 11 fallers with a range of classic crash injuries: a shoulder dislocation and punctured lung for Manuele Mori, a broken vertebra for Robert Gesink, a dislocated kneecap for Jesús Herrada, who was announced as having abandoned but finished the stage. The 2016 King of the Mountains, Rafal Majka, was blamed for the Thomas crash and ended up with deep abrasions to both knees and elbows.

Travelling at over 70 kilometres an hour on damp roads, Porte lost control approaching a bend and momentarily travelled off the bitumen. His flailing body careened back across the road and into a rock face, where Porte collided with the bike of Irishman Daniel Martin. The later diagnosis of shoulder and pelvis fractures are miraculous. This crash could have caused far worse.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

And that would be the reason MMT rides a bike with disc brakes and 28mm tires. Avoiding suicidal descents in wet conditions helps as well.  MMT hopes Richie Porte and the other ten rdiers that lost skin, were bruised and broke bones have speedy recoveries.

Until next time ride safe avoiding wet descents at 70 km/h

Marv

MMT’s Analysis of 2016 Olympic Road and Track Cycling

Dear Rouleurs,

I don’t know how to say this…but Australia had a realy sucky Olympics when it came to road and track cycling.  Of the 42 medals on offer, Australia won just 2.  Boo hiss…  So MMT wonders what will occur to the pot of cash Cycling Australia receives in the next round of funding for Olympic Athlete development.  Before dwelling in some really disappointing detail, contragulations are in order for Anna Meares, Bronze in the Kerrin and Messers Jack Bobridge, Michael Hepburn, Sam Welsford and Alex Edmondson, Silver in the Men’s Pursuit Team.  Here are some photos pilfered from other new outlets illegally of the only happy Australian cyclists at Rio in September.

Bronze Medallist, women's Kerrin event, Anna Meares.

Bronze Medallist, women’s Kerrin event, Anna Meares.

Anna Meares in action on velodrome.

Anna Meares in action on velodrome.

2016 Rio Olympics, Silver medalists for the Teams Pursuit event.

2016 Rio Olympics, Silver medalists for the Teams Pursuit .

The men's Pursuit team in action on the velodrome.

The men’s Pursuit team in action on the velodrome.

So lets look at the results for road and track cycling.  In the road events, the clear winner was the Netherlands who won 3 medals from the 12 on offer.  The rest were spread around fairly evenly.  Whether Australia’s Richie Porte would have figured in the results, after crashing out of  the road race, will remain idle speculation. Similarly Rohan Dennis must be kicking himself for going out too hard in the time trial. So bottom line, Australian cycling zero medals.

2016-olympic-cycling-results

The Track results were dominated by Team GB who won 7 of the 10 gold medals on offer.  Overall they scooped up 11 of the 30 medals on offer.  No other team was even close.  Here are the results and league tables.  The Womens Pursuit team were valiant in even competing on the track given the horrific training accident the team had 5 days before the event.
2016-olympic-cycling-leaguetables

Before signing off, MMT will take time to reflect on the amazing career and palmeres of Anna Meares, who became the fourth Australian track cyclist to line up at four Olympics.  Meares claimed her first of 11 World Championship titles in the 500m time trial in the months leading into her Olympic debut. She backed up her flying form at the Athens 2004 Games winning gold in the 500m time trial before going on to win bronze in the sprint.

Meares made one of the great comebacks in Australian Olympic history when she won a silver medal in the women’s sprint cycling at the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008. Seven months out from the Games she broke her neck in a race crash and after months of intensive rehab ensured she was back on the bike in Beijing. She progressed through to the final where she went down to long-time rival Victoria Pendleton to win the silver medal.

Four years on and Meares had her chance to turn the tables on Pendleton at the London 2012 Games. Meares beat one of the sport’s all-time greats backed by a boisterous home crowd to calim Gold. Along with five Olympic medals and countless World Championship podiums, Meares has also won eight Commonwealth Games medals, including five gold, across four Games.

Until next time, ride safe.

Marv